Home » A Theory of Time: an Introduction - The synchronisation of cosmic cycles - Initial questions by Ryszard Waluś
A Theory of Time: an Introduction - The synchronisation of cosmic cycles - Initial questions Ryszard Waluś

A Theory of Time: an Introduction - The synchronisation of cosmic cycles - Initial questions

Ryszard Waluś

Published November 5th 2013
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
23 pages
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 About the Book 

In this essay the author puts forward the hypothesis that individual heavenly bodies in a given group may have cycles which synchronise over a greater time period so forming a longer cycle which defines the rhythm of that part of the cosmos.We willMoreIn this essay the author puts forward the hypothesis that individual heavenly bodies in a given group may have cycles which synchronise over a greater time period so forming a longer cycle which defines the rhythm of that part of the cosmos.We will use the solar system as an example in order to gain an understanding of the topic. Our reference point, that is the place from which we are observing, will be the earth. We will examine the bodies in the solar system which are most visible on the celestial sphere, so we will limit ourselves to the sun, the moon and planets such as Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn.So what will be the cycles?In the case of the moon a cycle will be a revolution around the earth returning to the starting point fixed against the stars. In other words the cycle would be a sidereal month.The other moon cycle will be its revolution between successive full moons, the synodic month.The movement of the sun on the celestial sphere is a result of the rotation of the earth. This gives us yet another cycle called the solar day, i.e. the period between successive solar zeniths.The stellar day, the revolution of the earth relative to the stars, is another cycle.The cycle for each planet will be a revolution of the planet around the sun.I have adopted the expression synchronisation of cosmic cycles. The cycles described above are the ones I have in mind when I use the term cosmic cycle while referring to the solar system example. So what does the concept of synchronisation entail? Let us imagine that at a particular point in time we see the specific positions of the bodies under discussion on the celestial sphere: we are seeing them at a specific point in each of the cycles listed above. It is a unique arrangement. If at a future time - it might even be millions of years later - this same unique arrangement of the heavenly bodies mentioned above appears on the celestial sphere, we would call this event the synchronisation of the cosmic cycles of that group of bodies.In our example we have considered some of the bodies in our solar system, but we could investigate other groups of objects and structures which are linked by gravitational forces, such as galaxy clusters, galaxies, star clusters, stars etc.This hypothesis suggests the universe is a system in which there is an extensively interconnected interdependence between the systems of objects, between the objects which make up a system etc. The manifestations of these interactions may include the phenomenon we have called the synchronisation of cycles. Every object, every system of objects is in motion. Examples of this motion might be rotation of a body about its own axis or orbital revolution around a central point- the existence of a cycle would show there is recurrence. Recurrence can relate to the movement of a single object and also to the cycles of multiple objects within a group.CONTENTS- The synchronisation of cosmic cycles: a hypothesis- When did the universe come into existence?- Time cycles- What determines the duration of the individual cycles?- What do these numbers signify?- Initial questions